Unnamed Journal News

Unnamed Journal has been kicking a long for a few years now, and I’m mighty glad of it. As a creative outlet, as a process of marketing and stamping your corner of the internet, it has been invaluable. Not only did draft chapters of Void and Last Tomorrow first appear on UJ, but it’s given me a platform to create The Meditations of Caius Caliguliaa project I never thought I’d actually get off the ground, and has caused me to slowly build up my own homebrew space opera universe, short story by short story.

And that past tense doesn’t mean it’s going anywhere. Far From it.

If anything, UJ, currently a quarterly literary journal, is going to be expanding into other realms: a podcast, possibly a larger publishing arm. These things are in the future, and the details have yet to be hashed out. But UJ has a acheived a stable output, and we can only build from here.

 

LastTomorrow3
Apocalypse. Drugs. War. Birth.
Void5
An Existential Sci-Fi Monster Tale

KDP-Amazon Price Reduction

Looking over my bookshelf yesterday, I noticed that some of my books had prices that were all over the map.

For example, The Devil Left Him was $3.99 for Kindle, $6.99 for Paperback. Last Tomorrow was 5.99 for paperback. The Right of Revolution was $2.99 for Kindle. I think at the time, I was testing to see what priced worked and what didn’t, acting on the “you need to value your product, so others will, too.” But still, standardization was in order.

So I made some changes.

As of now, all my novellas are $2.99 for ebook, $3.99 for paperback. That’s the floor for Amazon’s 70% Royalty rate. And some of my earlier works I brought down to the 35% Royalty rate so I could drop the price further. Short essays like Revolution are now 99 cents.

Savings – Passed on to you.

I’m also considering doing a Hardcover version of Solar System Blues. Because I love that book.

Check out my Author page to take advantage of this.

ddb

An Update, Brief and Modest

So Party at the Last Tomorrow has had its moment. I got some good feedback on it, and I’m pleased that it picked up as much interest as it did. A Kindle Countdown deal suggested to me that I’m pricing these novellas too high. I’ve already dropped the price on The Devil Left Him to $3.99, I may drop Last Tomorrow as well, and price Void accordingly when it comes out.

In other news, I’ve shuffled something of my Medium profile around, removed some publications that weren’t doing anything, and created a new one: Pop Culture is Filth, to review and discuss the various arts. The title is ironic, I think.

Here’s a discussion of Silence by Martin Scorcese to open it up:

This is a more relevant story that it might seem at first glance: the film doesn’t just cut into the difficulties of being a missionary in a foreign land, or in the clanging misunderstandings of East and West. It cuts right into the question of how far a culture can go to defend itself. Japan in the 16th century attacked Christianity largely because it judged Christianity as too foreign to gel with its existing conception of itself. Japan would not be Japan if it was Christian, the Tokugawa shoguns determined, and those that felt otherwise were brutally suppressed. The film highlights the sufferings of poor Japanese Christians who suffered for the sake of a vision of a deity that lifted them up.

In the process, however, it rather failed to give its heroes the strength of their best possible argument, and so somewhat undercut itself.

There’s some significant changes happening to Unnamed Journal, too. More on that later.

View at Medium.com

I Get Reviews, But Not Paperbacks

LastTomorrow3I don’t know who this person is (an anonymous Kindle Customer), but they had this to say about The Party at the Last Tomorrow:

on November 10, 2017
Well written. Muse is Everyman on a subterranean journey. Clever use of language to create a world to fear and dread.

That’s a solid summation of what I was going for.

In other news, I have been trying for a week to get Last Tomorrow available on Paperback, and I’m having no luck. Every time I set it up, the thing goes into review, and then I get an email from Amazon saying I need to fix this issue before I can go live, and then the paperback goes back into draft form. The claimed issue is:

Text on the cover is outside of the live graphics area

I am completely confused as to what that means. There’s a link that goes to their help files, which are way too general to be helpful. I assumed that to mean my cover was too big, as I’m using the same cover image as for the ebook, only set on the front cover area. So I resized it. Still the same issue. I’m starting to think it’s some kind of bug. I’ve sent Amazon a help request, we’ll see what happens.

Last Tomorrow Edits are Final.

This lovely strange trip of a book is done and I’m ready to push the baby bird out the nest.

This is a story I’ve been imagining and tweaking with for some time. It’s time for it to meet the world.

Watch this space.

The Downside of Pantsing

As I’ve announced before, a good bit of Last Tomorrow was written on the fly. Like the US  Navy in WWII, I simply went around difficulties. That’s fun, but at some point, you have to force those little hidden Japanese jungle plot holes (I’m getting all the elasticity this metaphor has, thank you very much) to surrender. And I just hit a big one in the second chapter. Something happens and I don’t know who caused it to happen. It’s not super-important plot-wise, so I could just get rid of it, but it’s kind of important thematically, so I don’t want to.

And I need to decide who caused it to happen, otherwise it doesn’t make any sense. And I’m really not sure who it would be that did it. So I’m going to have to figure it out, or rework the event so that it makes sense.

Whatever, I’ll figure it out.

Here’s a post at Live Write Breathe that may have been useful to me when I was in this process before. Ah well. it’s never too late.