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I’m Waxing Philosophical on ThoughtCatalog

ThoughtCatalog is an interesting web site because it’s one of the few places on the Internet where you can reliably encounter diversity of opinion in the comment section. You can actually have a civilized discussion with people you disagree with. That’s a nice feature.

So I decided to contribute something: 5 Things We Should Probably Stop Complaining About.

When a society produces things in abundance, it also tends to produce the leisure to judge things. As the 21st century grinds on, we find ourselves surrounded by vexing irritations, almost all of which we have invented. And while evil and injustice stalk the world with the same strength they always have, we prefer to issue petulant rants about useless ephemera.

Normally they claim a two-week turnaround on submissions, but this got posted same-day, with an accompanying email saying they liked it. So share and enjoy, share-and-enjoyers.

A Message I Think Many of Us Self-Published Could Use.

At the end of a re-posted Sarah Hoyt Human Wave “manifesto”

You shall not spend your life explaining why your not-boring is better than your fellow writers not-boring.  Instead you will shut up and write.

 preach

There is nothing lamer, sadder, and more pathetic that author-on-author hate. Does anyone imagine that J.K. Rowling gives one tu’penny fark how many people slag Harry Potter? Of course not, which is why I stopped hating on them years ago. I still haven’t read them, because I don’t care, but good for her. Seriously. Another person’s success is not my failure, no matter how mystifying I find things.

I have never published anything that sold in quantities I want. That’s, well, it’s not okay, but whining about it accomplishes what? Grumping about people who didn’t like my work accomplishes what?

Aside from making you an entitled ninny and pseudo-aristocrat, I mean?

Authors: Social Media Will Not Bring You an Audience.

It will help you keep an audience when you’ve got one.

That’s not what this post at Book Designer starts to say, but that’s what they end up concluding. The lede is buried here:

Your key to more followers isn’t posting more frequently or having more conversations. Nor is it constantly checking your feeds to see who said what.

A readership develops because they have something to value and talk about. The best way to accomplish that is to give them more fiction. Writing good stories, as always, should remain your top priority.

Good storytelling will lead to a fan base, and then social media will start returning results. You’ll see more links, retweets, and likes. Your voice will start circulating and your reach will expand.

Joel has even proposed not significantly investing in blogging until you have a readership. I think that makes a lot of sense.

Suggestion: Work on your craft, refine your voice, polish and publish. That’s what matters most. The better your writing, the better social media will work.

I’ve been operating under the If You Build It, They Will Come idea since I started self-publishing. I’m glad to hear that I’m not out of my mind.