Why Oddballs Like Authoritarianism – And Why They Shouldn’t

Our first experience of belonging (or not, for some) is of a family.  And even in dysfunctional families, the parental authority, if it’s worth anything enforces the “he/she is weird, but he/she is ours.” In school, also, for the truly odd kid, the teacher and the supervising assistant, or whatever, are the ones who intervene to stop abuse by peers.

So at the back of the mind of a lot of oddlings — no matter how or what makes you odd — is the idea that a benevolent dictator could MAKE others accept you.  That you could fit in.

I completely understand the radicalization of minorities.

via Belonging — The Great Divorce a Blast from the Past From September 2015 — According To Hoyt

Oddly, I never got the idea in all of my bullied days that a more active, benevolent authority would have helped me. What I absorbed from my school days was that school officials were well-meaning and helpless. The official rules of the school were impossible to enforce in their entirety; there were simply too many violations. So the appearance of order was the goal. The bottom of the social hierarchy had simply to get through the day as best they could.

Just remember, bootlegging didn’t stop in Chicago just because Capone went to prison.

Anyway, Read the whole thing.

 

 

When Did the Left Lose its Goddamn Mind? or, David Jaffe is a Glorious Winged Twit

Who is David Jaffe? A director of the God of War video game series (The director? Co-Director? Wait, I don’t care). And apparently the experience of making a series based on a doomed Spartan warrior bloodily defying the Gods has made him a grumpy feminist who hates prom (don’t they all?)

Now, the first tweet is bad enough. Some kids go to prom and they co-ordinate the colors of their dresses/tuxes, and stage a picture in which the girls open the shirts of the boys, revealing superhero shirts underneath. Cute, right?

But no, not cute. Sexist and irredeemable, because the girls are all doing one thing and the boys are all doing something else, and this is the worst thing ever.

Now imagine, for a second, a prom picture with the roles reversed. The girls reveal superhero status and the boys look on (obviously the boys can’t be pulling the girls outfits open, because that would be exactly like a violent rape. Do try to keep up). Would anyone complain about it? Would anyone care? Would I do anything other than roll my eyes while leftoids fell over themselves applauding it’s bold countering of gender norms? Of course not, because I don’t feel the need to make myself a hateful pest over kids doing kid stuff.

I mean, if I worked at it,  I could reframe this in Red-Pill terms. Oh, the boys require girls to reveal their heroic nature? The boys can’t be heroes on their own? Men have no value in and of themselves unless blessed by the company of women?

If you think that interpretation preposterous, then you should be able to see why Jaffe’s is, too.

So why can’t Jaffe just let this pass? Why can’t he go “I see you kids. Cute,” or even “Whatever?” What makes him brim with self-righteous suffering at something that wasn’t meant for him?

Is this really the most important thing for us to be fuming about? A callout to a superhero trope in a prom picture? Really?

But then he doubles down:

Homer-BlankStare-1

Let’s go ahead and stipulate his actual argument: People willingly participating in something does not make it morally acceptable. On that, we agree. But that argument is generally reserved for people who are happily doing something morally wicked, such as you know, lynching people.

But this is kids taking a prom picture. It’s not even kids taking a prom picture that calls out something bad. It’s not white kids dresses up as Klansman or Nazis or ISIS (which would be really bad, because appropriation, you guys). It’s a callout to one of the oldest, most widely-recognized superhero tropes, in which the hero reveals himself as a hero. When did this become unallowed? When did this become something you compare to a group of murderous vigilante racists? How the %*$& do you even do that?

Let’s give David Jaffe a break, and assume that he did not think very hard about that tweet before he put it into the world. I’d like to believe that a moment’s reflection might have made him reconsider the wisdom of the comparison he was making. Currently, he’s “sad” that everyone his being “mean” to him for “sharing his thoughts.” But Twitter doesn’t reward reflection, so here we are, with this reflection of Jaffe’s un-examined prejudices, which is that kids doing something cute at prom is hateful and horrible, by default, unless it redeems itself by bowing to the correct ideology.

I don’t know why the Left is like that. I don’t know why they hate everything they look at. But I know that I’ve been perceiving it since I was a kid:the hateful, venomous condescension masquerading as righteousness. And if past experience is any guide, they will never, ever, see what the rest of us see when they do this.

Anyone Who’s Offended by Anyone on Red Eye is Too Stupid to Watch Star Wars

Knock it off, nerds.

More than a month ago, I made some jokes about Star Wars on Red Eye, a satirical political comedy show that airs at 3 a.m., and it has resulted in me being verbally abused and told to die by a mob of enraged fans for the past four days now.  The capital-offense comments were: “I have never had any interest in watching space nerds poke each other with their little space nerd sticks, and I’m not going to start now.

I don’t need to prove my Star Wars fan status, just hit the tag attached to this post. And if I did need to prove my status, then I wouldn’t because that’s deeply lame. But as a fan, the line about space nerd sticks is funny. It just is.

Search your feelings, you know it to be true.

So maybe instead of posting a ten-minute video about how ANGRY you are  that someone on Red Eye made a joke about your fandom, maybe just laugh it off and go back to making excited speculations about why Luke isn’t in the trailer.

Is this what being a Star Wars fan means? That we have to pretend that Star Wars is the most important thing that ever happened? That we have to send people death threats? Death Threats? Really? (Yeah, I know Beardy the Wonderfan offers the obligatory denunciation of death threats. But we shouldn’t have to denounce death threats made by Star Wars fans)

What do you do when you encounter someone who was born in say, the 1990’s, and never saw the Original Trilogy? Do you strap them down, peel back their eyeballs and give them a Ludovico viewing? BECAUSE STAR WARS IS A POP CULTURE INSTITUTION AND ALL MUST KNOW IT AND ALL MUST LIKE IT AND I FIND YOUR LACK OF FAITH DISTURBING.

The whole point of Red Eye is to engage in forbidden, non-PC humor (that’s why it’s on Fox). Nothing they say on that show should ever be taken at all seriously. If you can’t understand that, you’re too dumb to watch Star Wars, because you probably think that if you concentrate hard enough you can use the Force to make the Thrawn Trilogy better than mediocre (yeah, I said it. Come at me, nerds).

This is the kind of pedantic dweebery I expect from Trekkies. We’re supposed to be cooler than that. Come on.

Nerds are Never Happy: The Force Awakens Trailer

It was pretty cool.

First off: the slow intro, empty desert, sense of dread, reminiscent of There Will Be Blood. Dug it. The darkness sitting dormant.

Stormtroopers: Same but different. Questions abound: Are these Republic Stormtroopers? Some Imperial rump state? Is the guy who pops up in the desert a good guy pulling a Luke, or some poor stormtrooper who stumbles on to the source of all evil?

R2-Polie-Olie: Looked weird, in a cute way.

Girl on the Desert Speeder: I want to assume that this is Han & Leia’s daughter, based on what I know of the Expanded Universe. The speeder itself has a very Episode IV-Tatooine feel, without being an obvious knock-off of Luke’s T-16.

X-Wing Surfing: I want to assume that this is Luke’s son, based on what I know of the Expanded Universe. Or perhaps Wedge Antilles’ son. But for all I know, it’s someone else altogether. Still, cool effect.

Lightsaber with crossguard: I liked it. Sloppy, kinda goofy, but cool. The entire scene is menacing, but looking at the presumed Sith from behind makes me curious: is this a scene in which the good guys try to sneak up on Darth Whosis and fail? Is this Darth Whosis stalking a prey of some kind? I want to find out.

Millenium Falcon, now with obligatory J.J. Abrams lens flare: First time – Okay, pretty cool. All subsequent times – GREATEST THING EVER.

But that’s me. Warsies (what the Trekkies call SW fans) are now arguing over ever single aspect of this. For example, at the bottom of this Dorkly anthology of Force Awakens fan art (yes, already), somebody calls the Lightsaber-with-crossguard a “light claymore”. This creates an argument, because it’s a standard length-sword! This provokes a rehash of why a lightsaber with a crossguard is and is not totally impractical. Because magic swords have to make sense.

Also, did you know all Star Wars fans were racist? This is true because of a reddit thread in which people admitted to being confused by black stormtrooper, because obviously not a Jango Fett Clone. Cue arguments about whether the stormtroopers in the Original Trilogy were clones or not.

Also, rolling droid is totally the new Jar-Jar Binks. Totally.

nerdrage
EU Novels are Lucasfilm-approved! They’re CANON! Naaaaaah!

The only hope from all this pissy slapfighting is that we go in with low expectations. Between the Prequels and Lucas being an obstinate troll about the Special Edition, we have become a bitter and jaded fandom, ever ready to pounce on minutiae as preparation for disappointment. If The Force Awakens is competent (and there’s no reason to suspect it won’t be), that might draw some of the poison out, so we can go back to the important things, like making fun of Trekkies.

LOL.